All posts filed under: Uncategorized

We’re on Tumblr, too!

We are excited to announce that we now have our own ancient history blog on Tumblr. Founded in 2007, Tumblr is a microblogging and social networking hybrid platform that houses more than 132 million blogs. It is also among the top 15 websites in the United States of America. We’re excited to share new and reviewed education articles directly to our audience on Tumblr. This further compliments Ancient History Encyclopedia’s other social media pages on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, and Pinterest. With nearly 300,000 social media followers and 1.3 million monthly page views, Ancient History Encyclopedia is proud to function as the web’s nexus of “all things ancient.”

AHE on Flipboard, magazine-style

We’ve just put over 600 of our articles and definitions onto Flipboard, an app that allows you to read great web content in a magazine-style format. It’s perfect for browsing our ancient history content on your mobile phone or tablet, but you can also read Flipboard directly in your browser on the web. To make it easier to find your favourite content, we’ve divided our content into several “magazines”, all of which are centered around a specific subject area: Roman History Greek History Mesopotamian History Assyrian History Egyptian History Americas History Asian History North European History African History General History Topics Interviews Maps History Videos History Cartoons About AHE We hope you enjoy browsing AHE in this format! From now on, we’re going to continue adding to these magazines, so you can follow us on Flipboard, too.

Byzantine Beauty in Berlin

We are happy to welcome back Jaunting Jen to AHEtc! Surprise! Byzantine at the Bode One would never guess that the main attraction of the Bode Museum in Berlin is a mosaic from Ravenna, Italy. The Bode Museum, on Museum Island, houses a unique collection of Byzantine art, and I went there specifically for their Byzantine collection. I had no idea that a mosaic from Ravenna was waiting for me at the end of the exhibition hall. Ravenna holds a special place in my heart because it is one of the most beautiful places I have ever visited. I have not yet been to Turkey to visit the Byzantine splendors there, but I’ve been to Ravenna and the Torcello Church in Venice, and there is just something special about those places and that time period. The Ravenna Mosaic at the Bode Museum came from the Church of San Michele in Africisco in Ravenna, was dedicated by Bishop Vittore in May 545 CE, and was consecrated by Archbishop Maximianus in 547 CE.  The mosaic depicts Christ …

The Horses of St. Mark’s

Welcome to the second post on our new blog AHEtc! This time we welcome Ms. Jennifer Brown (Jaunting Jen) of the blog Jaunting Jen. Jen is an Army veteran, archaeologist, photographer, and historian working on her MA in ancient and classical history. We hope you enjoy her post as much as we do! Beauty Reigns Eternally Beauty. The four horses at St. Mark’s Basilica, Venice, can only be described with one word: beauty. They are called the bronze horses, but they are actually almost pure copper. If you stare at them long enough, they almost seem real. The two horses pictured above are looking at each other like they are sharing a secret, and we are left in the dark. It’s a miracle of history, time, and circumstance that these horses exist today. We are able to stand and admire their craftsmanship because of a long history of looting, theft, and historic preservation. The history of the four horses stretches the imagination. They may have been created by a very famous sculptor, Lyssippos, in the …

Scota: Mother of the Scottish People

It gives us great pleasure to welcome Ms. Susan Abernethy, manager of The Freelance History Writer, to Ancient History Encyclopedia as our first guest blogger. AHE’s “AHEtc. blog” will function as a place where ideas and experiences can be shared casually by those interested in all things “ancient.” We hope you enjoy it! Scota: Mother of the Scottish People An ardent, lifelong passion for history compelled me recently to start researching and writing on various historical topics. Curiosity, along with the presence of certain books in my library, led me to look into the history of Scotland. Scottish history is chock full of fascinating stories and quaint legends. Surprisingly, I discovered that the founding, mythical ancestor of the Scottish people was a woman named Scota, daughter of an Egyptian pharaoh and wife of a Greek prince, whose story may be based on actual events as borne out by DNA evidence.

1 Million Mark Surpassed!

We are pleased to announce that the Ancient History Encyclopedia regularly receives over one million page views per month! This is truly a momentous occasion and we are eager to see what awaits us as we come closer to 2014. At this time, AHE’s staff would like to extend a warm message of thanks to our financial donors, volunteer contributors, virtual visitors, social media followers, and past interviewees for helping us enter into the record books! Your kind words and messages of enthusiasm are a source of pride and inspiration. We would not be where we are today without your continued support and interest. We thought that we should use this occasion not only to celebrate an important milestone, but also take the time to assemble some statistics about Ancient History Encyclopedia: 1 million page views per month. 500,000 unique visitors per month (compared to 100,000 this time last year). Over 2.2 million visitors in 2013 so far. 66% visitors from the US; 4% in the UK, Canada, and Australia (each). We have spent £830 …

AHE Recommended by Tijdschrift Origine

It gives us great pleasure to announce that the Ancient History Encyclopedia (AHE) was recently profiled and recommended by the prominent Dutch fine arts magazine, Tijdschrift Origine (Nummer 3 2012, Jaargang 21). Based in Haarlem, Tijdschrift Origine provides independent, expert analyses on the international art sector, covering antiques, design, art history, and the protection of cultural patrimony. We applaud and thank them for helping bring increased public attention to the fine and applied arts, worldwide. Here is part of the review in Dutch: “On the internet is a new virtual encyclopedia for old (art) history: the Ancient History Encyclopedia. The English language site is fully independent and relies primarily on volunteers and voluntary contributions. Within the site are many articles as well as encyclopedic entries about classical antiquity. AHE also provides historical maps on their site. [The Ancient History Encyclopedia’s] search engine provides several specific searches by topic, time period, architecture, wars and battles. In preparing this [précis], ORIGINE counted 381 articles and more than 2,000 images. Of course, that number is rapidly growing. Furthermore, there …